Lophophora's spare bathroom

Welcome to my spare bathroom. I have been refining this space for indoor horticulture over the past year. The bathroom offers the very obvious benefits of adequate plumbing and drainage, and also comes equipped with a bidet- I’ve heard there are benefits to bottom watering. The small room is also great for climate control and has a door.

The most recent upgrade to my space is a bridgelux LED array I built with a little help from OG.

I also started some organic soil which I intend to eventually use in some no-till containers, but I am going to recycle the soil until I can establish what container size or layout really works best for me.

I am presently running a few plants from seed under 12/12 lighting as an experiment which should be finishing in the next week.




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Thats a nice setup you got started there.

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Love the ingenuity! Pretty good use for a spare bathroom I’d say

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Nice work @lophophora.ca at modifying and refining that spare bathroom. That’s awesome that you’ve built a light with those bridgelux’s too. I’ve heard nothing but great things and a buddy of mine close by built one not long ago. I’ll be following along, with your blessing of course :pray:

Can’t wait to see the fine plants you grow in there :smiley:

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You are too funny.

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Cool setup, makes me rethink not wanting to use empty spaces I have. Hopefully anything grown in this room will be “the shit” :stuck_out_tongue:

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Good use of extra bathroom. :+1:
:green_heart: :seedling:

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I have a second bathroom that I have thought would be perfect, just need to kick a few people out of the house and its mine!

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I’ve never had this many people in my bathroom before, I am truly flattered.

I long ago convinced my family that the fixtures don’t work, thus ensuring my continued dominion over the grow space.

Took these ladies down today. In my left hand is diamond OG (allegedly), and in my right hand is a strain referred to only as chocolate (I traded someone for an ounce of bud riddled with seeds).


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Tuning in and taking notes :nerd_face: :call_me_hand:

Cheers
G

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Very interesting use of space…and all the other clichés they use on home makeover shows. :grin:

After you convince the fam the fixtures don’t work, the odors coming from the space are easier to explain. “Must be sewer gas…I’ll turn on the exhaust fan”

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This week I chopped down a pollenated female. I wasn’t sure how much extra flowering time if any would be needed for seed production until the seeds began to rattle loose from the plant on their own. Turns out an extra week was plenty in this case.

I decided to try making some seeds after growing thirteen male plants in a row. The first six plants I took the time to train and grow surprised me with balls once they began flowering. Successive failures prompted my decision to start plants under 12/12 to aid plant identification. Sixteen seeds later I was out of weed, out of seeds, and had only three females. After what felt like a practical joke mixed with a statistical anomoly I decided to sacrifice one of the ladies for experimentation.

Pollenation was performed the old fashioned way- I gathered half a dozen males, gripped the selected female by the base of the stem, and whacked all the males with the female until the cloud of pollen settled. I have since learned a great deal about pollenation here on OG (I never know what search terms to use until after I’ve solved a problem), and the good news is that my technique has lots of opportunity for refinement. Hopefully next time I will be able to preserve some pollen as well.

The real measure of success for this project will be having something worth growing, and worth sharing.

Finally for an idea of the timeline I originally planted on 2021/04/20, pollenated on 2021/05/28, and harvested on 2021/07/20.

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Seeds look fantastic!
The general consensus here is 6 weeks minimum from pollination so you nailed that.
:sunglasses: :+1:

Cheers
G

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The little auto that wasn’t

I want to take this opportunity to derail my own topic. The following has nothing to do with lophophora and does not take place in my bathroom.

I have never before grown any auto plants until somebody recently blessed me with a blueberry auto. From the day the plant first appeared in my yard it was different, sporting three fingered and disfigured leaves, and baffling growth patterns. At seven weeks I see no signs of flower. I’m confident the original grower planted autos as I saw his plants from the same seeds earlier today and they are certainly flowering.

Is it possble that childhood trama prevented this plant from flowering? Can auto plants re-veg themselves? Is it likely that this plant will respond to photoperiod changes and flower in autumn?

I figure the 5 gallon pot is sufficient to flower an auto for 8 weeks but I’m starting to second guess the pot size as the 8 week mark looms on the horizon. Would this pot see a plant through to October? Would it be best to transplant straight into the ground? The soil in the yard has lots of clay and rocks, but the weeds seem to thrive with no problems.

There is also the option of just administering a bunch of LITFA and allowing nature to take it’s course. I’m not on any schedule and this unexpected orphan plant has already exceeded all of my expectations.

If any of the seasoned auto growers here have any insights or advice to share it would be greatly appreciated.

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I’ve heard that some plants that haven’t been fully line bred to be autos might have the occasional photo plant in its seeds. Likewise, an auto female that was hit by pollen from a photo male will probably a mix of auto & photo plants in the offspring.

Did your friend get these auto seeds from a breeder or did he make them himself?

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The seeds were purchased from a breeder as auto seeds.

My buddy has already harvested one of his plants from the same batch, and based on the dates provided to me the plant is supposed to be ready in five days. I suppose I just got the black sheep of the bunch, makes for a unique first-time auto experience.

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Out with the old

Took down three ladies last night. The purple looking plant was a mystery seed I found while cleaning. I suspect it could have been one of the chocolate seeds but that is as much certainty as I can offer. This particular bud is surprisingly dense and smells reminiscent of roasted coffee.

The other two plants (only one of which is pictured- they look the same) came from what I thought was a sweet tooth (Pictured two weeks into flower) that turned hermaphrodite and left me with many surprise seeds. These plants have a citrus smell to them and the buds are remarkably sticky. I think these seeds would be S1s given they were self-pollenated, but correct me if I am wrong.

Normally I would abstain from growing out some hermaphrodite seeds, but this plant had a vigor unlike anything I had seen before (until recently). It was a lot of wasted effort to remove pollen sacks and cope with the emotional rollercoaster that ensued. Still I decided to take a gamble out of desparation and it seems I got lucky this time around.

At any rate I don’t want to tell anymore sad seed stories. Time to put the past behind me.

In with the new

From right to left (and in chronological order):

  • Swackhammer, courtesy of @DougDawson and @DannyTerpintine. Thank you very much. There is a new space jam movie but I don’t see Swackhammer listed in the cast of characters. (I planted two but accidentally killed one, sorry.)

  • Skywalker Kush x JLO, courtesy of @ReikoX. Thank you very much. A rose by any other name would smell as dank, but I am a sucker for star wars named cultivars it seems. Edit- Any ideas how to speed up harvest or teleport me off this rock?

  • LSD, courtesy of @doge. Thank you very much. The little orphan clone that appeared on my doorstep really made for a great birthday surprise.

I very much appreciate the support and I hope to make each of you proud.

As I have recently made substantial upgrades and refinements to my space I think this will be more of a learning experience than usual. Hopefully I can get everything dialed in on the first try and pull six pounds per plant, fingers crossed.

All of the seedlings are at the three week mark approximately. Not sure how long to veg these plants. I’m going to play things by ear but I’m open to suggestions.

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Shed some light on my LED Build

After seeing the Cheap LED Strip thread (Cheap LED Strips : A Viable Alternative) I decided to construct and LED array of my own. Many of the builds in that thread are made with aluminium channel frames, or flat sheets of metal with nice threaded screw holes for mounting, with build quality surpassing many of the LED units available in the market. Of course I don’t have any metal working tools nor access to a machine shop so I had to improvise and wanted to share a few of the details of my bridgelux LED array build.

The driver is a meanwell XLG-240-L-AB, driving 17 Bridgelux BXEB-L0560Z-35E2000-C-B3 strips.

The frame is repurposed from a discarded painting. With the staples and canvas removed the frame revealed itself to be surprisingly sturdy and lightweight. I added a few lazy coats of mildew paint to protect the otherwise untreated wood from humidity. The frame may be ugly but it’s form serves unintended purpose. The protrusions at the corners allow the frame to be set down by the edges and even tilted back and forth while providing the delicate LED strips ample clearance from any mechanical damage.

Going by the initial eyeball measurements the strips should have fit perfectly but upon closer inspection the mounting holes were about 6cm short of being useful. I took advantage of the fine joint work on the corners of the frame to suck in the edges so the mounting holes are centred within the edge faces. The cross bar has also been modified with a back saw to accomodate the new dimensions.

The strips are mounted to the frame using a bunch of brass standoffs scavenged from years of PC upgrades and repairs. I have little faith in either the soft wood or the machine threads of the standoffs, so each standoff is additionally secured with superglue. The various coloured sharpie markings indicate I’m a measure thrice cut twice kind of craftsman.

Larger standoffs are used at the edges and in the middle of the frame to allow the LED array to be set down on or leaned against hard surfaces without damaging the diodes.

Screw in eyelets and two equal length pieces of hardware wire allow the frame to hang from rope pulleys.

Each LED strip is wired in series to the next using some solid copper wire salvaged from an old flourescent ballast. Most of the rest of the wire I have only said 300V on the side and I didn’t want to tempt fate with substandard wire.

The toolless input sockets for the wiring are a nice touch, although I would probably just solder the leads next time instead of meticulously bending three dozen little jumpers.

A 6-slot terminal block connects the strip wiring to the driver DCV Output, and also the ACV Input to an IEC power socket for mains voltage. I realize that is a panel mount socket and that it looks haphazard, but under the tape each lead is properly crimped and insulated.

I used a short input cord deliberately to double as an emergency cut-off in the event that the mounting hardware should fail. I don’t want all the exposed solder points falling on any part of my body, and especially not when they are coursing with 330VDC and I am grounded to my bathtub. I also insulated all of the exposed solder points with pieces of electrical tape.

For the 3-in-1 dimming leads I attached some banana plugs. This gives me the option of easily changing or removing the dimming source, and did not require me to warm up the soldering iron. I have completed setting up a PWM dimming controller which I intend to install sometime in the forseeable future.

That’s about it, happy growing.

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Nice work! I have so many light parts around that I need to get on building!

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Love the dimmer wiring!! :sunglasses: :+1:

That’s a great light build. Great job on the recycle.

Cheers
G

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