Outdoor growing, What are these spot's

Hi There,

Slowgrower here, I’m from the Netherlands, 25 years old. Came across overgrow because it was mention in a book i’m reading about cannabis, so decided to take a look. Very interesting here and all so polite.
So decided to introduce myself here, this is my first year growing and hope all will go well. I have 4 plants (3 Power Flower & 1 White Widow) and 2 clones from the White Widow. And they are growing well, but i’m still wondering what these spots mean. It could be a shortage of K or Magnesium. I can’t quite put my finger on it, I hope someone can shed some light on it

Greetz, slowgrower

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looks like leaf miners. there is a faq but I don’t see those in it.

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I agree, specially after watching the pattern of the last pic Arriba|nullxnull . I have bookmarked this thread I accidentally found:

There is something aboutit:

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I don’t see anything to be alarmed about, yet.

That damage is so minor that it could be anything or nothing. Deficiencies and pests are hard to catch in early stages, but your head is in the right space asking questions when anything looks even slightly “off”.

Those plants look fine to my eyes. Keep a close eye and see if it gets noticeably worse, but relax for now. They look healthy and happy.

I spray pesticides on my outdoor plants earlier in the season as a prophylactic measure, you may wanna consider that going forward. Peace of mind is valuable.

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I agree. There’s no such thing as perfect leaves on an entire plant outdoors. As long as nothing gets out of control, you’re fine so far.

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Yeah you’ll drive yourself nuts trying to achieve 100% perfection at all times. No such thing as flawless when it’s a living thing. Just like everything, there’s always a “margin of error”.

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What concerns me more about your situation is the complete sterility of the surroundings of those plants. IF something does move in on them what will be there to balance things out? What would attract lady beetles, hoverflies, predatory mites, spiders, minute pirate bugs? All the critters that we don’t thank enough. Maybe the rest of the surroundings is richer in regards to plant diversity?

I have learned this the HARD way, that’s the only reason I go on about it. I’ll also be the first to admit that I have an agenda to end the “perfect” lawn, and our tendency to wipe out diverse communities within the urban landscape.

I’ll go away now :grin:

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Thanks for the feedback,
I think i’m gonna threat them with some pesticides, as a precautionary measure. (I’ll try to do it as biological as possible). And especially after seeing some leaf miner patterns ( see new photo’s)

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I’ve only seen leaf miners (larva stage of some species of wasps, moths, and flies) be a big deal on trembling aspens. I don’t think you’ll find one example of someone’s cannabis crop being totally ruined by leaf miners. It’s usually just a little unsightly. Parasitoid wasps may lay their eggs in them, so they do feed some good predators. So that’s good news for you :slight_smile:

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