Satanic Horse Moth

Founds this satanic horse head looking moth today.

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We have some large ones here in the summer. There is one that is just a tad smaller than a hummingbird, and looks and feeds just like one, too. It has the long beak and flies around in mornings and evenings in and out of flowers gathering nectar. I have some pics somewhere if i get lucky… I’ll post it if I can find it.

I love my bug life here on the ranch! They are a great source if my entertainment many days, lol. Works for stoners!

That could possibly be the same moth… not sure.

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If it’s evil, it sure is beautiful :grin:

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You might try here

https://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?guide=Moth

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Maybe??

Acrolophus piger, _Piger_Grass_Tubeworm_Moth, I_JP42292
Click on image to zoom in.
© John Pickering, 2004-2017

title Acrolophus piger, Piger Grass Tubeworm Moth
country United States
state/province Georgia
county Clarke
city/place/location Athens
street/site/trail 275 Blue Heron Drive
latitude 33.8882
longitude -83.2973
MAP decimal latitude_longitude ••• 33.8882_-83.2973
determined by who-email-yyyymmdd Mary Doll 2011-08-29
date1 yyyymmdd 2010:06:07 23:50:19

Click here to send feedback about this page to pick@discoverlife.org

Image

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Cool, I answered another question while looking, but here is the Google page I found… people actually call them hummingbird moths but it has a scientific name.

The cool thing is I already had photos of the caterpillar if came from but always wondered what it would be… just found out… now I have to look for the pick of the huge caterpillar.

Hummingbird moth

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Favorite thread of the day!!!

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One of these is the hummingbird moth, I believe… They’re both similar. I found one at my last house and the green one here. I couldn’t figure out what they went to, lol. I’m always amazed at how nature evolves to match the environment. The one looks like it has one eye, but that is on the tail, he… fakey fakey… gotta fool the birds I guess.

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Awesome pics gang. Splendor of nature :slight_smile:

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That reminds me of a big green potato caterpillar. Such a cool insect.

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The green one is a tomato hornworm and the one eyed critter is the Abbott’s sphinx moth. The moth in the picture is a sphinx moth.
:smiley:

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Just found this little guy as well. I’m on a roll today.

Check out the way this gray tree frog can change colours to match its surroundings perfectly like a chameleon. These aren’t typically found in my area but I have a lot on my property for some reason. It even has flecks of green mimicking the grime on the side of my deck.

Here is one I found last year on a plant

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Was it in your basement? Do you own night vision goggles? If so I’m calling Jodie Foster…

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Yep, I found the green one on my tomato plant. The other I didn’t know. I thought I’d seen the moth here before that Mongo showed so that makes sense.

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My mom has a perennial plant called a ‘butterfly Bush’ that attracts them and gets hummingbird moths occasionally, really cool creatures!

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I had a 5 lined skink running around in the grow room yesterday.

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I have some cool lizards here but they are sort of shy. I have a couple of good shots somewhere. Saw a large Garter snake yesterday. Biggest one I’ve seen in my yard. I love it when the summer crew all get out. It’s like a zoo around here.

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That’s probably a Buddleia. [Butterfly Bush] (https://www.almanac.com/plant/butterfly-bush) They are great for attracting butterflies, but sometimes they can get out of hand. There’s a native plant called ‘Butterfly Milkweed’ (Asclepias tuberosa) that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars as well as providing nectar in their bright orange/yellow clusters of blooms. Butterfly Milkweed

Critters and plants are cool.

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Gray tree frog changed green today.

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Wow, that’s really cool. I think I remember them from the southeast. It looks like oak bark and lichen.

I have a big frog or two near the back of my barn. It’s so dry here, I always wonder how they got here and how they survive… I think of them as wet weather or wet area for their habitat. It’s dry as hell here. He’s always back there where I mow the grass. Just missed him a couple of times… I better get a photo of him. It might be something similar. I always see it gray but it does look camouflaged.

One of my lizard/skink is striped but turns blues and bright greens on half of its body. He’s shy to the camera though.

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