Speeding up ro filter?

Is there a way to speed up an ro filter. Mine takes like 20 minutes a gallon and I keep forgetting about it and wasting a bunch of water when I fill my jugs.

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All you can really do is a pressure pump, but your membrane is going to be rated for only so much pressure. RO takes time.

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20 minutes per gallon is actually fast. If you want to control when it stops running, hook up a float valve to the line that goes to the filter systems faucet and place the float valve in a tote or something similar for storing the water.

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We’re renovating a house and just installed a new tankless RO system rated for 500GPD (20+ gallons per hour) at the kitchen sink:

It wasn’t cheap but it’s a lot more efficient that other models I’ve seen and used in the past.

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Dummy me wasted water. Flooded my garage. Had to quit that.

These are popular econo portables.

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20 is quick. Used to take me hours to fill a few 5 gallon buckets. Super hard source water dramatically slows it down. As mentioned, pressure pump or auto shutoff float valve is your only options.

That’s the filter I have. It works, I just need to keep an eye on it.

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Yeah, my source water is pretty clean. 130ppm out the tap.

Adding more pressure to your RO system can lead to a catastrophic failure.

If you really hate waiting then just build a holding tank (with a float valve of course).

Random picture off the Net

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that thing looks sweet but I already bought the 7 stage ispring :confused:

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This sounds like your best option …

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I think I’m just gonna be more attentive. Solutions seem to cost more than the problem.

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@EugeneDebs420, if you already have a container to hold a quantity of water, all you need to buy is a few feet of 1/4" water line (the same your RO system probably uses), a “T” connector for the water lines and a float valve like this:

float valve

That float valve is about $8 at Home Depot. You can get the water line and T connector for a couple of bucks. Seriously, you’ll never regret spending so little on something that you’ll utilize constantly.

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I have a pressure booster on mine but the RO system is heavy duty with stainless steel membrane canisters. Not the home depot set-ups. You can actually build a set-up yourself. As long as you’re not doing recycling or multi-stage RO, it’s not complicated to build a system. The most expensive items are the membranes and the booster motor.

It make a huge difference being able to produce around 5 gallons in less than 10 minutes. Add larger membranes or membranes in parallel and the time drops, as well.

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