Disabled Veterans growers

I didn’t use any while I was in the service, but I’ve seen since then how it’s helped a lot of people recover from various afflictions. When I was younger I was kind of skeptical when people would call it medicine… I’ve changed my mind on that!

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I’m a veteran, and have used VA health care for a long time, in several different areas of the country.

One thing I learned, is policy towards thc in your system varies from one location to the next…

Things have improved over the years-

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@slytofhand @Syn my thanks to you both and to all other members who have served.
I lot of my friends joined the military straight out of high school.

alameda? I hope us locals treated you well while you were serving there. I had a friend who worked as a mechanic on that base before he left the service. He gave me a alameda base zippo but it got stolen while I was in college.

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Nam Jan’66-Dec’69…brown water navy, pushing barge around up n down waterways with floating bridge equipment. Thank all veterans for your service and welcome home brothers!
All I can say is I’m damn sure glad they didn’t piss test in the 60s!!! The opiated hash in Nam was the ‘shit-to-get’! :sunglasses: :wink: :rofl:

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Haha, them piss testing in 'Nam! I’m sure even top brass would be pissing hot.

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The natives were fine. I’d go back if cost of living wasnt so high. I enjoyed the upper bay area. I ate alot of tacos at the corner of Fruitvale. Hung around a bike shop in town from time to time.

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I was a Coastie for awhile as well , and was also in Jersey(besides cape may) in CG I was a coxswain at a small boat station, was chosen to go to drug training when the CG got into the drug war around 77 or so

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I was stationed at small boat
Cape May and Townsend inlet NJ.

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know them both , I was stationed at Great egg station Ocean city, they later tore down the station i guess.
Was in charge of the cup races parade a few times off Atlantic city which was our group

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I’m a bit late to the party. Medically retired a few years ago after an injury. It’s awesome seeing so many DV growers. When the VA starts providing cannabis, veteran suicides are gonna plummet.

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Growing is as therapeutic as using the fruit. Bonsai like.

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That is what my hubbies private doctor did. He would let him have 5/6 Norco. But when I told him I was giving edibles the doc made the 85 year old man with Alzheimer take a drug test and fired him as a patient. He was a vet but had private insurance from a job he did for ~50 years.
I don’t get the medical system at all.
:seedling: :green_heart: :seedling:

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Cured patients don’t make money.

Doctors get money for prescribing meds, but the med company has some rules, and one usually is not a narcotics user. Marijuana is Schedule 1, the worst narcotic.

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Cannabis is illegal because during Nixon’s time in office his cabinet for cannabis prohibition was made up family friends and the rich old white men of his time. The laws were made out of racial prejudice. Don’t want to talk about racism but the War on Drugs especially the war on cannabis is racially motivated. I’ll take it one step further and say it is also a form of classism. Most of those that are locked up are poor or disenfranchised. Sickens me how big Pharma makes money hand over fist poisoning the people they supposedly help. The pockets blowing out from all of the revenue. It’s so bad now our potable water is tainted by our over use of prescription drugs.

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Lol look at 1920’s bud

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Veteran here. Not disabled.

I was getting out just as the original gulf wars were getting underway. All the medical personnel from my base got shipped overseas. As did our marine detachments.
I guess they didn’t yet need communication techs in Iraq, so I was released from active duty as scheduled.

I got a wartime service medal, even though I did nothing except stayed stateside fixing airplane radios. :roll_eyes:

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Ill check in here :slight_smile: Not disabled in any way, have some war wounds, but no issues on my end. I volunteered for it, and enjoyed every minute of it. (both the times I thought I would not make it back, and the good times…all part of what makes me who I am today)
EDIT: And strangely enough, the woman I was with all thru highschool, then up and left one day for the Army and said Ill be home someday baby. Well, that day finally came…we got married 9 years ago. She claims to this day, I am absolutely no different than I was back in highschool. She wonders how that can be…(Not untill I shot someone on our property in the blink of an eye a couple years ago, and drug the body to the house so the cops didnt have to go to far, did she realize maybe I am different) (Dont be a meth head, come onto our gated property at 3am and point a gun at me, you will not make it out alive, I promise you that.)

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keeping the unit mission ready!

I was an electronics repairer, the only one in my unit. Which is surprising since there was only one person above me in my shop, my warrant officer. I was a SPC in charge of 3 PFC’s and 1 PV1. We didn’t do much in my shop :stuck_out_tongue:

Since I was in charge of my shop, i had to go to a brigade meeting every month to tell the top brass our mission readiness, which had to be above 98% mission ready. We were always 100% in my shop, so there was no issue in my team.

The first time I went to a meeting, I was the only one there that was below E-8, here I am, 24 years old talking to people who at the bat of an eye could have had my military carrier end in a split second.

Needless to say, the first couple months I went, I had sweat pouring off my face.

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Did a year in Afghanistan, mostly in the southeast, and also around the foothills of the Hindu Kush. We didn’t interfere with their agriculture, we would convoy past the fields. I had a lot of respect for the farmers and was hoping they were growing high quality.

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