Grounding your plants

I first heard of DJ Short doing this a long time ago, but I haven’t really heard of many other people grounding their plants like this. Has anyone here tried it, and if so what were the results?

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Super interesting but so many factors. Also those plants were taller but not by much. Would need a control group and very stable genetics. Maybe run the same group of clones in two rooms, one grounded one not.

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Ive heard Wade Laughter, the guy who bred Harlequin, talks about this on Hash Church often. I’ve never done it myself, but have always wanted to try it.

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I am a huge proponent of this. I really dislike container gardening indoors for this reason. Outdoors, you can stick a grounding pole through the container. I wish I had some sort of science or data to back this up. I know plants have extraordinary sensory capabilities that we are just beginning to understand. They can sense water and grow toward it, even at great distances; they have memories and can remember being dropped and even begin to anticipate; they can communicate and cooperate with one another, in a rudimentary manner, using mycelium. If I am not mistaken, these statements are not terribly controversial.

There is so much we don’t know about plants and their intelligence. I guess my feeling is: why wouldn’t they know if they weren’t electromagnetically grounded? I hate that I’ve become one of those new age types as I’ve gotten older. I am on the spectrum and my faith in quantifiable science has been absolute and unwavering my entire life, to the point where I’d feel contempt for those that didn’t share my viewpoint. But I’ve noticed I get better results, in life and in gardening, when I go by feeling instead.

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Oh yeah this makes sense. If you stick 2 copper wires in the ground a few inches or a foot or so apart from each other you will get voltage. Soil in a pot will generate it as well, especially with water running through it. So being able to ground the plant and the soil it’s in could definitely be beneficial. How so I can’t quantify, but it makes some amount of sense to me just from abstract perspective.

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Not yet, I ground myself regularly in the summer don’t run around in bare feet much in the winter, but I do have a grounding wrist strap I use when messing with computer parts.

Kirlian photography might show the difference between a grounded and non grounded plant in a pot.

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That grounding strap for electronics is damn near a lie btw. I took A+ and they were all about that wrist-strap and the anti-static bags. I bought all into that kool-aid and was later horified when I got my current job and all the cards are in bins laying all over, ram in bins, cpu’s tossed in buckets, no anti-static bags to speak of and damn near everything works every time.

As long as you’re not walking around in socks touching circuit boards, you’re basically never gonna have an ESD event. Biggest thing is to always touch something metal, like the pc case, before touching any circuit boards. But in the 25+ years of working on computers, I’ve only seen an ESD happen once and that was socks on carpet and then went to pick up a motherboard without touching anything metal first.

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Grounding is interesting. But so was growing without grounding. The hanging gardens of Babylon was one of the 7 acient wonders of the world.
“The majority of scholars agree that the idea of cultivating gardens purely for pleasure, as opposed to the production of food, originated in the Fertile Crescent, where they were known as a paradise. From there the notion would spread throughout the ancient Mediterranean so that by Hellenistic times even private individuals, or at least the wealthier ones, were cultivating their own private gardens in their homes. Gardens were not just about flowers and plants, either, as architectural, sculptural, and water features were added, and even the views were a consideration for the ancient landscape gardener. Gardens became such a desired feature that fresco painters, such as those at Pompeii, covered entire walls of villas with scenes which gave the illusion that on entering a room one was also entering a garden. All of these outdoor pleasant places, then, owed their existence to ancient [Mesopotamia.”

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Pure uncut pseudoscience woo-woo.

No different than crystals, burning sage, and reiki.

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We just need to decalcify your third eye!

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Aw hell man you post nutrient recipes how do you not see this as nonsense?

Do you wear those copper wristbands to “help with pain” or carry quartz crystals in your pocket?

Plants don’t give a heck about copper wire or magnets. If it worked that well everyone would do it and it wouldn’t just be fringe old time weed growers like DJ Short posting about it.

It’s just pure stoner logic train of thought. “Nerves use electricity, my house uses electricity, I’ll just bury some copper wire to help balance chakras”

Ya know, you’re right. I’ll sell you special plant specific grounding wire. It appears as regular copper wire, but it isn’t. It’s $100/ft. I take cash.

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This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

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I didn’t get a chance to read all of it yet, but this looked interesting:

http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?filename=1&article=1019&context=ag_researchbulletins&type=additional

https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4520&context=rtd

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.395.8333&rep=rep1&type=pdf

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.276.2794&rep=rep1&type=pdf

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.908.8878&rep=rep1&type=pdf

http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/bitstream/handle/123456789/12482/EFFECT%20OF%20ELECTRIC%20FIELD%20ON%20GROWTH%20AND%20DEVELOPMENT%20OF%20Vicia%20faba%20L..pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2019/10/21/electro-culture-the-boost-of-plant-growth-with-electricity/

https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/329232?mobileUi=0&

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I removed off-topic and some lightly offensive posts.

Please discuss this topic in respectful manner. I know it is controversial topic but please - there is no absolute truth. Don’t come to the topic just to show disrespect…

The more controversial topic it is the more sensitive you need to be. Don’t repeat yourself, making your point single time is enough…

Thank you!

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It has been already proven (experiments using CO2 marked with radiation) that for example trees have mycorrhizal networks they use to communicate with each other (sending distress signals) and (I hope I remember that correctly) they can even share nutrients (old trees helping younger).

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cool article, I will check it out, I love smithsonian magazine

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I read a lot of interesting thing in a free course in coursera. Titled “understanding plants” lot of info about the red light switching the plants off and also how insect attack is dealt with and how plants communicate with each other.

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I have read about grounding in people , AKA earthing and even used a grounded sheet on my bed at one point.
I could see this being of benefit to indoor plants and tbh never really thought of it before.

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Im trying to figure out why someone would flag this comment.

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IDK, I thought he meant it as a joke, as I did. shrug

Disclaimer: Please do not apply cal-mag to one’s own internal glands lol.

In all seriousness, most of this grounding “theory” seems to come from one guy in particular who believes shoes are evil because they prevent a flow of electrons. It sounds made up, or I’m just being a doubting Thomas, but his name is James L Oschman and he’s heavily involved with what I can only politely refer to as “alternative” science.

So, brass tacks here, the idea is based on that we (and I guess our plants) are “electron deficient”, which to me, personally, comes off as pure pseudoscience woo-woo.

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