Unique Landrace Traits

There are some “jungle” varieties of Panama Red that will grow spikes around the bottom of the main stalk. :slight_smile:
:guitar:

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For real!? Like rose thorns? Or longer spikes?

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Some of the old school Viet black has them
@Ceilingless , @Guitarzan

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Thanks for posting a photo! Really interesting. So they are stiff and not bendy right?

Would the viet black technically be a “jungle” strain as well?

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Those are typically pre roots, and will show under the first node, if buried to cover them they will grow out.

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That’s a very cool trait. Sounds like an adaptation to give the plants a better chance of survival if the stem snaps. If the plant was lying horizontal on the ground after it got knocked down or snapped in the wind, those pre roots could take hold as soon as they touch soil.

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Indeed, most all our plants do that actually it’s just white bumps/dots typically though if humid enough at that ground level they will throw the aforementioned spikes. So good reason to top up your pots to just under the first node if you have space to do so.

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Vietnam Black is an old hybrid of a Vietnamese landrace and Afghani. The Panama Red actually has spikes on male plants. Snowhigh calls them thorns, and that’s definitely what they look like… perhaps the plants were repeatedly getting dug up by some animal in their home climate(?) Plants from wet regions can have Roots growing out of the stalk like the Vietnam Black pictured above. East Manipur varieties can do this too.
The original Moroccan has adapted to a climate that has gotten drier and drier in Morocco over the last eight hundred years. Kind of a hurry up and finish making babies before you die from drought type of trait The plants actually begin to flower as the days are growing longer, similar to an Autoflower. They will do this even in a wet climate with longer days (NY…16 hrs daylight). Plants from the Egyptian Sinai, and also a Sudanese landrace will do this as well.
Pulga from Parvati Valley, Himachal Pradesh, India has been witnessed growing completely encased in ice for two weeks straight.
Many Indian Land races smell like Indian spices. We all select plants that have terpenes we enjoy and they must love Mama’s cooking in India LOL😁. Curry, Masala, Cumin and other spices have been described as common terpenes.

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Yeah mate they do. I’ve a lot of those terps going on. My favorite is a cross of Tanzanian landrace and my diesel cookie hybrid (ecsd X jack herer) X forum cut. Great yeild, strong euphoric energising strain with herbs and spices almost a panang curry.

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@Upstate that is so cool! So you could potentially have an winter outdoor grow and not worry about frost? I’m assuming it’s just while in veg, so you could start it before first frost and you’d be golden?

So on the Moroccan and similar strains of you were to try and grow them indoors one would need to extend my daylight hours to trigger the flower??

Love me some Indian food, I’m going to look for some curry terps!

It’s such an adaptive plant. I never realized the extent though

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Holy Sh*tballs… you’re like a landrace encyclopedia! Learned so much from this. How do you know all of this?

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For more high quality landrace info, check out The Central American landrace and heirloom thread. :grinning:
:guitar:

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Lol. Lots and lots of research. 4+ yrs. I asked and still ask lots of questions to people that know more than me. I love learning about this stuff, and I soaked up the information like a sponge. I don’t have a photographic memory, but with certain things it’s pretty close. The interesting details that I learn are the ones that stick with me the most.

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It’s something you don’t have to worry about Frost, it’s just that the plants don’t die and don’t suffer any Leaf damage. But the cold does stunt them like other plants. I had mine survive plenty of cold, but the flowering kind of stalled. There are pictures on Cocogenes IG page showing the plants encased in ice. If you look at all the pictures you can actually see that the plants are growing. Of course it didn’t get colder than 32 in the middle of all that ice…
Moroccan will flower under any light cycle, like an Autoflower. But if you have the choice, and you were growing Outdoors it’s best that the plants flower after the summer solstice. The light from the sun changes after the solstice and becomes better for flowering with more red light…, however I have found beginning to flower sativas prior to the solstice helps control their height from the blue Spectrum the sun’s Rays have at that time, and the plants will finish while the sun is still strong enough for proper Bud formation at my Northerly latitude

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When you said they were encased in ice, I thought you meant a thick layer of frost. Not a plant-cicle. That almost looks like Jell-o with a carrot in it! I can’t believe there is any life in it, let alone growth!!!

And I get what you’re saying now with the Moroccan.

Never knew that about the blue light before the solstice. Learned a little about how light affects plants from a podcast, but it was all indoor stuff. Now I’m going to need to learn more about the outdoor side. Love it!

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Pulga
Sudan

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Think we met on insta upstate.

headband hso version X black cherry. Hope those Norfolk Island sativa provide you with something truely unique. :wink:

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Yes we did😁 i had you briefly confused with someone else i met on insta…

As someone with a memory that is a sign of a wasted youth, I have always been jealous of people who are good at absorbing information via text.

I have a friend who can almost remember everything he has read in his life. Like you he is a walking encyclopedia about subjects that interest him. Im like a goldfish… did I read this page already or not?

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Interesting. I was under the impression it was a hybrid between a pure Vietnamese from the south near Saigon, and a Chinese line from the north near Hanoi. Can you tell me more?

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